Politics is Triumphing Over "Common" Vote Fraud Problem

The Miami-Dade Police Benevolence Association is sick of vote fraud in Florida and is going to do something about it, offer a reward

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Campaign finance reformers knifed in the back by academic studies

Campaign finance reformers have had a tough go of it lately. A near decade-long losing streak at the Supreme Court has been compounded by the demise of public financing for presidential campaigns. Most view proposed fixes, like Harry Reid’s constitutional amendment, as cynical ploys to motivate low-information voters with Pavlovian missives about evil industrialists. Even supposed supporters pay only lip service while calling for “big, fat checks.”

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FEC Chairman Goodman Defends Book Publishers

In a Federal Election Commission (FEC) session last Wednesday, Republican Chairman Lee Goodman warned that the FEC could attempt to regulate book publishers under its authority to make campaign finance rules. Chairman Goodman will be a featured panelist at this year’s RNLANational Election Law Seminar.

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The Myth of Voter ID Difficulties

Instead of helping people vote, or take advantage of the many benefits that government ID can provide, the left instead wants to use them as examples.  Whether it is Viviette Applewhite  the plaintiff in the anti-ID case in Pennsylvania who obtained an ID during the trial or one of the plaintiffs in the Supreme Court case Crawford v. Marion County who actually had a Florida ID, the left is much more interested in making political points than helping voters.

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Convenience Voting Yields Poor Turnout

A new report issued by the Center for the Study of the American Electorate (CSAE) last week suggests that the upcoming election season will yield the lowest midterm primary turnout in history. National turnout in 2010 was down 18 percent for states that held statewide primaries for both major parties, reaffirming RNLA’s findings in its PCEA report that early voting has little to no tangible benefits.

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Nuclear Fallout

Anyone who had any doubts of the Democrats real goals on executing the “Nuclear Option” on judges should have no doubts now after the narrow confirmation of Pamela Harris with only 50 votes yesterday.  The Democrats are trying to pack the courts. 

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The Case for Standing: Boehner’s Lawsuit

The primary issue in Speaker Boehner’s lawsuit against President Obama is that of standing. Opponents argue that it will be difficult for the House to prove it has been personally harmed by the President’s inaction as an institution. However, John Malcom and Elizabeth Slattery of The Heritage Foundation argue that the case for standing is rooted in the House demonstrating, “to a court’s satisfaction that as an institution, it has been personally harmed by President Obama’s actions, which have effectively nullified the votes of its members, leaving it little recourse to rectify this injustice without court intervention.

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The 2014 Republican Lawyer of the Year Reception Honoring Mark Braden

Mark Braden with the Lawyer of the Year certificate presented by Speaker John Boehner.
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Harris’ Rushed Nomination Heads to Floor Vote

The Senate will vote today to end debate on the nomination of Pamela Harris to the U.S. Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals. This comes after the Senate Judiciary Committee rushed through the confirmation process and voted on July 17 to send Harris’ nomination to the full senate. As discussed in a previous post, Harris’ nomination raises serious concerns.

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NY Times is So Scared it is Trying to Redefine "Wave"

One of the things I have learned in my time in Washington, DC is that the New York Times is a reliable propaganda arm for the DNC.  So when the New York Times’ Nate Cohn wrote this week “Goodbye to the Republican Wave?” I knew they were writing to get the Democrat “spin” out the election on two matters. 

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